Former municipality in Hedmark, Norway

Hof is a former municipality in the old Hedmark county, Norway. The municipality existed from 1838 until 1963 when it was merged into Åsnes Municipality. In 1963 when it was dissolved, the municipality encompassed 422 square kilometres (163 sq mi). The administrative centre was the village of Hof where the old Hof Church is located.[1]

Hof Church in Åsnes

Hof was located in the traditional district of Solør. Hof was bordered by Grue municipality to the south, Asnes municipality to the north, Våler, Nord-Odal, and Stange municipalities to the west, and the Kingdom of Sweden to the east. The eastern part of the municipality was part of the Finnskogen area.

Name

The municipality (originally the parish) was named after the old Hof (Old Norse: Hof), since the first Hof Church was built on its ground. The name is identical with the word hof which means "temple" (as in a temple of the old Norse gods).[2]

History

Historically, the prestegjeld of Hof included the main parish plus the sub-parishes of Åsnes and Våler. The whole parish of Hof was established as a municipality on 1 January 1838 (see formannskapsdistrikt law). In 1849, the two northern areas of Hof were separated to form the new municipality of Åsnes og Våler (population: 7,087), which drastically reduced the size of Hof municipality. The split left Hof with a population of 2,913. During the 1960s, there were many municipal mergers across Norway due to the work of the Schei Committee. On 1 January 1963, the municipality of Hof (population: 3,222) was merged into the neighboring municipality of Åsnes (population: 6,750). On 1 January 1969 the Rotberget area (population: 23), which had been a part of Hof until the 1963 merger, was transferred to the neighboring Grue municipality.[3]

Government

All municipalities in Norway are responsible for primary education (through 10th grade), outpatient health services, senior citizen services, unemployment and other social services, zoning, economic development, and municipal roads. The municipality was governed by a municipal council of elected representatives, which in turn elected a mayor.[4]

Municipal council

The municipal council (Herredsstyre) of Hof was made up of 19 representatives that were elected to four year terms. The party breakdown of the final municipal council was as follows:

Hof Herredsstyre 1960–1963 [5]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)11
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)2
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)4
Total number of members:19
Hof Herredsstyre 1956–1959 [6]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)11
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)3
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)4
Total number of members:19
Hof Herredsstyre 1952–1955 [7]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)9
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)2
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
 Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)3
Total number of members:16
Hof Herredsstyre 1948–1951 [8]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)8
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)4
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)3
Total number of members:16
Hof Herredsstyre 1945–1947 [9]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)7
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)4
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)3
Total number of members:16
Hof Herredsstyre 1938–1941* [10]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)10
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)4
 Local List(s) (Lokale lister)2
Total number of members:16

See also

References

  1. ^ Thorsnæs, Geir, ed. (16 February 2021). "Hof (Innlandet)". Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Kunnskapsforlaget. Retrieved 12 March 2022.
  2. ^ Rygh, Oluf (1900). Norske gaardnavne: Hedmarkens amt (in Norwegian) (3 ed.). Kristiania, Norge: W. C. Fabritius & sønners bogtrikkeri. pp. 264 and 271.
  3. ^ Jukvam, Dag (1999). "Historisk oversikt over endringer i kommune- og fylkesinndelingen" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Statistisk sentralbyrå.
  4. ^ Hansen, Tore, ed. (26 July 2019). "kommunestyre". Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Kunnskapsforlaget. Retrieved 30 January 2022.
  5. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1959" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1960.
  6. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1955" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1957.
  7. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1951" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1952.
  8. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1947" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1948.
  9. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1945" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1947.
  10. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1937" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1938.